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Most Annoying Typographical Errors

20 items ranked

Print this list, post it above your desk, and refer to it frequently to avoid making yourself look foolish on the page.

Rated 0 points - posted 9 years ago by phdlist in category Other.
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1.

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Using a comma without a conjunction to connect what could stand as two complete thoughts. Report Abuse
1 point - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

2.

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Misspelling “sincerely.” Report Abuse
1 point - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

3.

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Using “I” when you should use “me.” Report Abuse
This error just makes the writer sound pompously ignorant.
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

4.

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Using “literally” when you’re using a metaphor to describe something. Report Abuse
It isn’t literally raining cats and dogs, you didn’t literally get soaked to the bone, nor are you literally going to need a rowboat to get back home.
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

5.

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Using “whom” when you should use “who.” Report Abuse
Yep, pompous and ignorant.
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

6.

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Using quotation marks around a word to show emphasis. Report Abuse
Classic example: “FRESH” Eggs! (because we prefer rotten eggs, right?)
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

7.

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Not using an apostrophe to write the contraction of “it is.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

8.

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Using an apostrophe when you mean to use “its” to show possession. Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

9.

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Allowing spell check your incorrectly-spelled “definitely” to read “defiantly.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

10.

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Using “your” when you should use “you’re.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

11.

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Using “there,” “they’re,” or “their” incorrectly. Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

12.

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Using the phrase “all of the sudden” instead of “all of a sudden.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

13.

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Using an apostrophe-“s” to make a word plural. Report Abuse
All you need is an “s” or an “es,” and maybe every now and then, only an apostrophe, but never, ever an apostrophe-“s.” Really.
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

14.

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Using “lose” when you mean “loose.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

15.

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Using “sacred” when you mean “scared.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

16.

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Using “breathe” when you mean “breath.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

17.

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Using “then” when you mean “than.” Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

18.

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Ending sentences with prepositions Report Abuse
As in, “Sentence fragments the writer doesn’t seem to be aware of.”
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

19.

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Awkwardly rearranging a sentence to prevent ending it with a preposition Report Abuse
As in, “Sentence fragments of which the writer doesn’t seem to be cognizant.” While this is technically correct, it’s also rather painful.
0 points - added 9 years ago by phdlist -

20.

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Sentence fragments the writer doesn’t seem to be aware of. Report Abuse
-1 point - added 9 years ago by phdlist -
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