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Best Things to do to Help Your Child Succeed at a Musical Instrument

21 items ranked


Rated 0 points - posted 8 years ago by amelco7 in category Kids.
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1.

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Buy them a Beatles CD. Report Abuse
20 points - added 8 years ago by guest -

2.

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Encourage your child to make up his or her own songs or compositions Report Abuse
creating compositions will help motivate him or her to complete the more routine parts of learning an instrument (scales and studies, and so on)
1 point - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

3.

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encourage your child's school to start or improve its music program Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

4.

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buy music books Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

5.

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encourage your child to enter competitions Report Abuse
some children need extra motivation to perform at their best--competitions mean goals, as well as feedback from someone other than a parent or teacher
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

6.

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learn alongside your child Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

7.

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listen in on practice sessions Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

8.

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tell the music teacher or band leader that you appreciate what he or she does Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

9.

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attend your son or daughter's concerts and recitals Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

10.

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Talk about practicing in a positive way instead of making threats or cajoling Report Abuse
reward systems are more fun to use--and have good results
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

11.

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Create opportunities for your child to play music or collaborate with friends or peers—in a band or chamber music group, for example, or to accompany a school event Report Abuse
it is enjoyable to play as a group--this will be something he or she will hopefully continue on into adulthood
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

12.

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Listen to music—as many different styles as possible Report Abuse
for developing an understanding of rhythm and style; for appreciating many styles of music
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

13.

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Go to concerts with your child Report Abuse
hearing others perform will motivate your child to practice
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

14.

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Use stickers on a weekly practice sheet—or have symbols your child can colour in after each practice session Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

15.

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Use a metronome Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

16.

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Celebrate achievements Report Abuse
it is important to celebrate after an exam or a concert or recital--go out for a treat like dessert or a meal, or a movie your child has been wanting to see.
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

17.

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Reward goals—set goals for number of minutes to practice, or number of practice sessions per week Report Abuse
a reward system is just as motivating (or better than) threats for what will happen if they don't practice
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

18.

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Take notes at the lesson—or have older children take notes themselves, right after the lesson. Report Abuse
it will help them remember what they learned, and reinforce the lesson
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

19.

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Keep a log—keep track of practice times, and what was practiced Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

20.

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Make sure the instrument is in tune each practice session Report Abuse
keeping the instrument in good shape is important
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -

21.

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Keep the instrument in good shape, and in a safe place Report Abuse
0 points - added 8 years ago by amelco7 -
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