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Guam's greatest examples of ecological threats

20 items ranked

Guam is outstanding as a warning example of the ecological devastation of a country by bio invasion and destruction due to men's self-centered personal interests.

Rated 0 points - posted 9 years ago by amelco7 in category World.
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1.

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Brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis) Report Abuse
Believed to have entered as a stowaway in the wheelwells of a U.S. military transport toward the end of World War II. It has nearly eradicated the island's native bird population as the island previously had no native species of snake.
2 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

2.

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Black francolin (Francolinus francolinus) Report Abuse
Black francolins were introduced from India in 1961 as a game bird and is Guam's only legal game bird with a bag limit of 5 birds per day during the 2 hunting seasons per year.
2 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

3.

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Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) Report Abuse
September 2007 an infestation of the coconut rhinoceros beetle was detected on Guam in Tumon Bay and Faifai Beach and a quarantee was soon placed. Adults chew down into the folded, emerging fronds of coconut palms to feed on sap. Guam is to implementing an integrated eradication program using pheromone-baited, attractive traps to capture adults.
1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

4.

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Pigs Report Abuse
Pigs introduced by the Spanish, gone feral, play a major factors in the decline and loss of Guam's native plants and animals.
1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

5.

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Giant African snail Report Abuse
An agricultural pest introduced during WWII by Japanese occupation troops
1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

6.

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Tangan tangan brush Report Abuse
The dense forests of northern Guam have been largely replaced by thick tangan tangan brush (Leucaena, native of the Americas) during the past century. During World War II much of Guam's foliage was lost. tangan tangan was introduced in 1947 when the U.S. military seeded the island from the air to prevent erosion.
1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

7.

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Philippine deer (Cervus mariannus) Report Abuse
The Philippine deer (Cervus mariannus) is having an effect on the native vegitation of Guam
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

8.

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Dogs Report Abuse
Dogs introduced by the Spanish have been a factor in the decline Guam's native animals.
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

9.

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Water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Report Abuse
Herds of these animals harm native ecosystems. After birth control and adoption efforts proved ineffective. The U.S. military began culling the herds in 2002 because the water buffalo herds were obstructing military base operations.
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

10.

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Cane toad (Bufo marinus) Report Abuse
imported in 1937
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11.

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Coquí Report Abuse
Coquí may have arrived from Hawaii They are a loud chirping frogs native to the Caribbean. They do provide food for the snakes but their noise may detract from tourism.
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

12.

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Tinangaja Report Abuse
This virus that affects coconut palms was first observed on the island in 1917 at a time when copra production was still a major part of Guam's economy. The coconut plantations no longer exist on Guam and the dead trees from the epidemic are still seen throughout the forests of Guam.
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

13.

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soil erosion due to deforestation Report Abuse
Soil erosion caused by wildfires is carried by the heavy rains causing water quality problems for southern Guam. The eroded silt is also destroying the marine life in reefs around the island. So great is the damage, soil stabilization efforts have been of little success.
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

14.

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Sea turtle overharvesting Report Abuse
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

15.

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overfishing Report Abuse
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16.

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Bay dredging Report Abuse
To provide a better experience for hotel guests, portions of Tumon Bay were dredged by the hotel chains. Since then, Tumon Bay has been made into a preserve.
0 points - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

17.

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other frog species Report Abuse
frog species able to threaten crops also threaten the ecosystem because they provide additional food,perpetuating the presence of the brown tree snake that has destroyed the native bird population.
-1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

18.

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non-native grass species Report Abuse
Non-native grass species dominate much of the landscape in southern Guam. They have overtaken previously forested areas that have been burned. The forest burning has intensified the soil erosion.
-1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

19.

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Wildfires Report Abuse
Most fires, 80 percent, are arson by poachers. The damage has had devastating results to the marine life, water quality and control of invasive grasses.
-1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -

20.

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Poachers Report Abuse
Poachers are usually the cause of the wilkdfires that are started to attract deer to the new growth.
-1 point - added 9 years ago by amelco7 -
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